fbpx
All Posts By

woman practicing breathing techniques in nature and being mindful

Getting Started with Mindfulness

By | General Wellbeing, Mental Health | No Comments

What is mindfulness?

 

Originating from ancient Eastern traditions, mindfulness is essentially trying to connect our mind to the present moment, non-judgmentally.

However, when our mind swings from the past to the future, and back again, it can rarely have a chance to rest in the present.

Why can this be unhelpful for mindfulness?

 

When we recall painful memories/regrets, or worries for the future, we feel the horrible feelings that come with it and can’t do anything to change it.

We have no control over what has already happened or what is to be. Our power and control rests solely in the present moment.

What does being in a state of mindfulness feel like?

mindfulness words in a wave illustration

 

If you think about the moments when you feel most calm and at peace, it is usually when you’re completely engaged in the moment, free from unhelpful self-talk and stress.

It might be feeling the breeze on your face when you are outside, enjoying a hot shower, or being engrossed in a hobby.

Your whole being is involved and engaged in the moment, body and mind.

This integrated state is so different to what we are used to – driving home from work and thinking about dinner, on a zoom call but wishing you were talking to your friends and talking to your friends with your mind on housework!

How can mindfulness be achieved in daily life?

 

Try an activity where you can actively connect with your body:

  1. Laying on your back in bed/on the couch, feeling the rise and fall of your breath in your abdomen and chest.
  2. Body scan. Work your way slowly up from your feet to your forehead, simply noticing the sensations in each part. You can take this a step further by intentionally tightening and loosening muscle groups (progressive muscle relaxation)
  3. Taking a deep breath, stretching your hands up to the ceiling, and exhaling slowly allowing your arms to rest gently by your sides. This can be repeated for a few minutes

mother and daughter practicing yoga pose in the loungroom

Make the most of nature:

 The outdoors is an easy space for us to feel connected with our senses and trying to get outside when the weather is good can be helpful.

Use your senses to engage in the moment – what can you hear? See? Touch?

When we feel stressed and overwhelmed, trying to ask ourselves “What is under my control right now?”

These are simple practices we can all try no matter where we are, the aim being to make it more than a ‘practice’ but an awareness that can benefit our lives.

mindfulness woman in nature holding out her arms

 

To see where you are at in your mindfulness journey, you can try this simple questionnaire called Mindful Attention Awareness Scale 

Smiling Mind can support your (and your family’s mental health throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. They offer a FREE daily mindfulness and meditation app and guide at your fingertips. You can learn more about them here

Priyanka Nair HealrhMint Medical Centre Psychologist

Priyanka Nair

General Psychologist (BHSc, MHSc, PGDipCounsPsych)

Priyanka is a lovely and warm registered Psychologist, trained in New Zealand.

The two main modalities used by Priyanka are, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), and Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT). Priyanka also has experience with Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT), and has conducted skills-based groups for both adults and children.

Priyanka has worked with adults presenting with a range of concerns including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, work and financial issues, chronic fatigue, interpersonal difficulties, adjusting to physical illness, grief, and managing sleep. She has seen the impact of mental distress on career, relationships, and personal happiness, and aims to equip clients with skills to manage the mind. She is passionate about third wave psychology, and particularly resonates with ACT, a values-based, mindful approach to managing the mind and its thoughts/emotions.

Priyanka is aware of your needs, and will tailor every session to accommodate you. She is able to build rapport easily, and works with you to find a long-term approach to manage any unhelpful patterns in your lives.

Book Appointment

Watch Priyanka introduce herself here

HealthMint Telehealth consultations medical clinic update

Telehealth

By | Clinic News, Featured | No Comments
You haven’t heard much from us since last week, so we wanted to give you all a quick update. Please help share  this post to help us notify as many of our patients as possible.
 
Please also bear with our team who are all working extra hard right now – we are inundated with calls, questions and bookings. We maxed out our phone lines 15 times today!
 
Paul and Chantelle have had their heads down working hard over the weekend and into the night to get a telehealth solution off the ground. This is something we hadn’t planned on rolling out formally for another year or so, but these are strange times! Our aim is to:
 
1. Keep our team and our patients well; and
2. Keep the practice going so that we can keep taking care of the community and keep taking pressure off hospitals
 
You know that we are always looking at things in new ways to create great potential. What we have now done is found a video platform and a workflow which makes it possible for our GPs to keep consulting from home. This means that in the worst case scenario, if the clinic has to physically close, or in the scenario that a practitioner is sick and needs to self-isolate, we can keep providing services. It also means that you don’t need to come into the clinic in order to have a consultation. We may also need to roll out clinic-wide teleconsults in the coming days as a preventative measure.
 
We are nearly booked out for tomorrow (Wednesday) for our on-site GPs, but we do have a couple of doctors who are trialling taking consultations from home. If you need an appointment, you can call up to get booked in for a teleconsult for tomorrow (and beyond).
 
There are a few limitations, and we are just testing this out now to see how it goes. The first limitation is with online booking. Hopefully in the next few days we will have a clear way for you to book these online. For now, if you could please call and request a teleconsult if you have any symptoms of any illness.
 
The second limitation is the Medicare rebate. We currently can’t provide rebates for all services via video consult. We have decided to trial this service at a rate of $25 per 5 minute block (or part thereof). We had done this previously with phone consults. We will monitor how things go, and may change the price or length of consults as we get some data. There are limited situations where bulk billing may be available, but this is complex and on a case by case basis.
 
The third limitation is taking payment. We don’t have a way (yet) for you to put in your payment details and have payment taken automatically after the consult (like uber). So reception will be calling you afterwards to take payment. We are relying on your honesty and goodwill towards us to make this as easy for us as possible, so we can keep things going.
 
Now is the time when communities band together, and we want you all to know that we are here for you, fighting for you. Please fight for us, work with our team and help us to keep them and you safe. 💚

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here

Virus Symptoms

By | Flu, Hygiene, Respiratory, Virus | No Comments

Virus Symptoms:

Viruses are a common part of our lives. Virus symptoms are usually similar, and we can be struck down by one at least once a year. Once a family member falls ill, it is only a matter of time before it can spread to the other members of the household, making it feel like the sickness has gone on forever!

Each year, viruses change and different strains can circulate in the population. Currently, the coronavirus is flooding our news. While we are still learning about the virus, it has been around in different strains for many years in animals, however this is the first strain that has infected humans. What we do know about this virus and other similar viruses, can help keep our children and families safe.

NOTE: If you have travelled overseas, been in contact with someone who has travelled overseas and/or suspect you may have the novel coronavirus please call the dedicated hotline on 1800 675 398 PRIOR to visiting a GP practice.

What is the coronavirus?

The World Health Organisation (WHO) classifies Coronavirus (CoV) as a large family of viruses that cause illnesses ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases.

Click here for up to date information on the coronavirus from the Australian Department of Health.

What are the symptoms of the virus?

Common signs of infection include fever, cough, shortness of breath, respiratory symptoms and breathing difficulties.

In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death.

Is the virus a cause for panic?

At the time of publishing this blog, there are 15 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Australia, and every measure is being taken to limit the spread of the virus. It is important to stay informed and listen to the advice of health officials.

It is also very important to not panic if your child or family member gets a cough, a cold or a fever – or all three combined! It is far more likely to be the common cold, or the flu (influenza) than it is to be coronavirus.

Just for a bit of perspective, influenza infects many more people every year – in the millions worldwide. For 2019, there were a total of 310,011 laboratory confirmed cases in Australia, with 812 deaths that were notified to the NDSS.

People with existing health problems, weakened immune systems and older adults are at a higher risk of influenza, coronavirus and other common viruses.

When should I seek medical attention for virus symptoms?

Symptoms of a virus that need medical attention:

  • Severe cough that will not subside
  • A high fever that won’t come down with the aid of ibuprofen
  • Extreme fatigue and unusual sleepiness
  • Refusing to eat and drink – not going to the toilet for several hours and not having a wet nappy, and any signs of dehydration
  • Trouble breathing – sucking in around the ribs, rapid or heavy breathing

How you can reduce your chances of being infected by a virus:

  • Wash your hands! Use soap and water, and wash consistently for at least 20 seconds – or as long as it takes for your children to sing the alphabet song.
  • If you are out and don’t have access to a sink then ensure you have a bottle of sanitiser at the ready. Make sure you give your hands and in-between fingers a thorough rub.
  • Wash or sanitise hands before and after meals, after being around anyone who might be sick, after being in public places like parks, playgrounds and shopping centres and on public transport
  • Teach your kids not to touch their mouths, eyes, noses with their hands. Carry tissues or baby wipes for those sneezes and avoid hankies which are breeding grounds for bacteria.
  • Make sure your child has had the flu vaccine. The flu is far more common and bigger threat in Australia than the coronavirus.
  • Thoroughly cook meat and eggs
  • Avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing

WHO advises people of all ages to to take steps to protect themselves from the virus by following good hand hygiene and good respiratory hygiene.

What to do if you have virus symptoms or suspect you have the novel coronavirus

IMPORTANT: If you have travelled recently or been in contact with anyone who has travelled overseas and you suspect you may have the novel coronavirus, please call the dedicated hotline on 1800 675 398 PRIOR to visiting a GP practice.

A list of countries with confirmed cases can be found here.

 If your child does have a fever and cough don’t panic, trust your gut instinct and make an appointment with your GP if you do have concerns. If you are going to visit a GP practice please call up and inform reception beforehand that you are coming in and please wear a face mask.

the importance of mental health scrabble tiles healthmint cranbourne medical centre

The Importance of Mental Health

By | Lifestyle, Mental Health | No Comments

What is mental health and why is it so important?

Mental health is an important during every stage of life – from childhood to adulthood. Understanding the importance of mental health is vital to optimising all aspects of wellbeing. Mental health is inclusive of our psychological, emotional and social wellbeing.

HealthMint psychologist Priyanka Nair explains that mental Health affects how we think, feel and act, and therefore is directly linked to how we handle stress and the situations life throws our way. Working towards a healthy mind is a lot about unlearning our unhelpful ways of thinking/behaving, and learning helpful ways to manage stressors. 

The World Health Organisation defines good mental health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realises his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.”

How to improve mental health

We can improve our mental health by taking care of our body (eating healthy, getting enough sleep, slowing down), connecting with others (friends/family/community), and spending time doing things we enjoy.  Maintaining a gratitude journal and working towards achieving a goal can also help us feel positive and motivated.

Seeking professional support can be helpful at times when things are overwhelming, and psychologists can help equip you with skills to better manage stress, low mood, and relationships. 

Here are several ways you can take steps to improve your mental health today:woman happy with her mental health healthmint

  1. Exercise
  2. Eating well
  3. Going to bed on time
  4. Writing down something you are grateful for
  5. Be positive to yourself
  6. Open up to someone you trust
  7. Do an act of kindness or to be helpful
  8. Knowing your limits and taking a break

What is a mental health plan?

A mental health care plan is something you can complete with your GP if you are experiencing mental health issues. It involves collaboratively forming goals with your GP, and receiving a referral to a psychologist for 6 sessions.

These 6 sessions allow you to receive a medicare rebate of $86.15 per session (for general psychologist), and ensures a multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to your care. Individuals are entitled to 10 medicare rebates per calendar year for individual psychology sessions.

importance of mental health

How can exercise improve mental health?

  • Exercise releases endorphins and serotonin that improve your mood.
  • It gets you out of the house and into the community –  encouraging connections with others, and reducing feelings of loneliness/isolation.
  • It helps regulate your sleep so you can have a goods nights rest which helps to make you feel more energised during the day.

If you or someone you know is struggling with mental health concerns call Lifeline on 13 11 14

Priyanka Nair - Psychologist HealthMint

 

Priyanka Nair is a general psychologist at HealthMint

For more information on our psychology services, click here

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here
dr terence from healthmint medical centre performing a blood pressure check at berwick lifestyle community

High Blood Pressure – Symptoms & Treatment

By | Body Systems, Elderly and aging | No Comments

High Blood Pressure – What is it?

Firstly, your blood pressure is the force of your blood moving against the walls of your arteries. It is expressed as two numbers.

High blood pressure (HBP) is also known as hypertension. It means that the pressure in your arteries is high then what is in a normal range.

Your blood pressure should be below 120/80.

It is the leading and most important risk factor for stroke.

As your age increases, so does your chances of having a persistently high blood pressure.

Over time, elevated and high blood pressure can also weaken your heart, blood vessels and kidneys, and makes a stroke or heart attack more likely.

 

high blood pressure symptoms and treatment healthmint medical centre

When should I have my BP checked?

It is easiest to get your blood pressure checked at every visit to your GP.

If you already have high blood pressure, every 3 months is recommenced, and every 4-8 weeks if your current medication is being changed. 

What are the symptoms of high blood pressure?

It is very important to get your blood pressure checked as there are no symptoms that can directly be felt to indicate you have high blood pressure.

While high blood pressure has no exact cause, it may develop due to the following reasons: A family history, your exercise and physical activity levels, weight, food and alcohol intake.

What is the treatment for high blood pressure?

An appointment with your GP is the best way to figure out treatment for high BP.

Medication is the most common form of treatment, and while they can not cure high blood pressure, medication can certainly control it. Once you start taking medication for high BP, it is likely you will have to keep taking it for the rest of your life.

Other things like positive lifestyle changes can also help control your blood pressure. Making healthier choices and increasing your activity levels are some of the options your GP may discuss with you.

 

going kayaking and making healthy lifestyle changes to help manage high blood pressureWhat are the benefits of managing my BP?

Managing your blood pressure can help decrease the risk of stroke, kidney disease, heart disease, nerve damage.

It is very important to get it checked regularly. Any of the GPs at HealthMint can do this for you when you book an appointment at the clinic.

If you have any concerns about your BP, it is best to seek medical advice.

 

Check out an infographic from HBPRCA here.

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here

How to Improve your Gut Health

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

What is gut health?

Gut health is the balance of microorganisms that live in the digestive tract. Looking after and improving your gut health is vital to your physical and mental health, immunity, and levels of anxiety and stress. Read on to discover how you can improve your gut health.

Gut health is important and is linked to the following:

  • Immune function
  • Weight management
  • Mental health
  • Autoimmune conditions

What causes gut health issues

How do I know if my gut health is off?

  • Upset stomach: gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhoea and heartburn can all be signs of an unhealthy gut
  • Food intolerances: bad bacteria in the gut can cause a difficulty in digesting some foods and also cause bloating, abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhoea
  • Autoimmune conditions
  • Difficulties sleeping
  • Fluctuations of weight

how to improve your gut health

What can you do to improve your gut health

  1. Change your diet: Eat plenty of non-processed or low-processed foods that are low in sugar and fat. A diet higher in protein and fibre can help aid in gut health.
  2. De-stress: Stress and gut health go hand-in-hand and can affect your whole body. Ways to reduce your stress can be as easy as heading out for a walk, taking up yoga, getting a massage and swapping your coffee for a low caffeine drink.
  3. Ruling out food intolerances: Try to eliminate the foods that trigger your gut issues to see if your symptoms of bloating, cramping, diarrhoea and fatigue improve.

how to improve your gut health

Recommended food types to improve your gut health

  • Fermented foods: benefits hav e been documented to improve the gut health. Some of these probiotic foods to include are yoghurt, sauerkraut, kimchi and kefir.
  • High Fibre foods: Bananas, beans, legumes, fruits and vegetables
  • Bone Broth

Gut health and anxiety

Yes it’s true – your gut and brain and intrinsically connected. The gut is sensitive to emotion! Anger, anxiety, sadness, happiness, are all feelings that can trigger symptoms in the gut.

Feelings of being nervous before a big meeting at work, or pains during times of stress are a part of the gut/brain relationship.

how to improve your gut health, anxietySymptoms of gut health and anxiety

  • Loose stools
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Shaky hands
  • Weight loss
  • Restlessness
  • Procrastination
  • Drinking or smoking more
  • Overwhelming sense of tensions and pressure
  • Quick tempers and quick to snap
  • Depression
  • Poor concentration
  • Indecisiveness

If these symptoms are of concern to you, it may be a good idea to chat to your HealthMint GP or Psychologist. There may be strategies to help deal with the triggers and in turn, improve your digestive and gut issues.

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here
Coronary Heart Disease HealthMint

Coronary Heart Disease – Causes, Risk Factors & Prevention

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

What is Coronary Heart Disease?

Coronary heart disease (also commonly known as coronary artery disease), is caused when your coronary arteries get narrower and reduce blood flow to the heart. This happens due to a slow build up for fatty deposits, called plaque.

The coronary arteries are the blood vessels that supply the heart with blood.

It can be the usual underlying cause of a heart attack.

CHD prevalence is twice as high among men than women, and increases rapidly with age.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics,  CHD is the leading cause of death in Australia, and is also a major case of disability.

Heart disease kills one Australia every 28 minutes – 51 lives are lost every day.

Coronary Heart Disease HealthMintCauses and risk of Coronary Heart Disease

There is no single cause for CHD, but the following risk factors can increase your chance of developing it

  • Age – as we get older there is an increased risk of CHD
  • Ethnicity – People from some ethnic backgrounds are at a higher risk, such as from the Indian sub-continent and Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people
  • A family history of heart disease/stroke
  • Being overweight or obese
  • High cholesterol
  • Hight blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Not following a healthy diet
  • Not being physically active
  • Smoking

Some risk factors like age and gender cannot be changed, however there are many steps that can be taken in order to reduce the risk of developing CHD.

Coronary Heart Disease HealthMintHow do you know if you have Coronary Heart Disease?

Unfortunately, many people are unaware that they have CHD until they have a heart attack or angina.

It is possible to work with your GP to find out if you are at risk of developing the disease, and they may order the following tests in order to check the health of your heart:

  • Echocardiogram
  • Angiogram
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG) or Stress ECG

Coronary Heart Disease HealthMintHow you can prevent Coronary Heart Disease

There is no cure for coronary heart disease, but healthy lifestyle choices and medications can reduce your risk for further heart problems and and relieve or control symptoms.

To help prevent CHD the following can help:

  • Stop smoking
  • Increase physical activity
  • Control blood pressure
  • Control cholesterol
  • Be a healthy body weight

Among older women, regular light physical activity can be found to be associated with a lower incidence of CHD.

Can you treat Coronary Health Disease once you have it?

There is no cure for CHD, however if you already have it, there are treatment options that your HealthMint GP might recommend to reduce your risk of future heart problems, and to help relieve, reduce, and manage symptoms.

The following medicines can help treat CHD and its risk factors, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol levels:

  • Aspirin
  • Beta-blockers
  • Statins

Please consult your GP before beginning any new forms of medications.

Other treatments can include bypass surgery, Angioplasty, stent implantation, and implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD).

 

Consult with one of our GPs and our Accredited Practising Dietitian, Saabira Wazeer.

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here
effects of lack of sleep on your body healthmint medical centre cranbourne north

Effects of Lack of Sleep on your Body

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

Sleep is important to our body and helps our systems regulate and repair after our waking hours each day. Although sometimes life gets in the way and we find ourselves not getting enough sleep on occasion, longer term effects of not getting enough shut eye can lead to various health problems and also cause danger and impede judgement to yourself and others. Here we explore some surprising and scary effects that the lack of sleep can have on your body:

What are the some of the symptoms of a lack of sleep?

  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Yawning
  • Moodiness
  • Forgetfulness
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Lack of motivation
  • Increased appetite

The body has to fight harder when you’re lacking sleep

A lack of sleep on the body prevents the body from having a strong immune system and makes it more prone to sicknesses and infection. It can also means that the body will take longer to heal from any existing illness and increases the chances of developing chronic illnesses and other serious health problems.

effects of lack of sleep on your body healthmint medical centre cranbourne northSerious health problems

Sleep disorders with chronic sleep loss can cause heart attacks, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure just to name a few

A lack of sleep causes accidents

Around 20% of fatal road accidents involve driver fatigue. According to the Transport Accident Commission (TAC) in Victoria, fatigue is a major cause of crashes resulting in some 50 deaths and approximately 300 serious injuries each year. Sleepiness and sleep deprivation can cause havoc on the roads and is a major problem when it comes to the road toll. Drowsiness can have the same affect on reaction time as drunk driving.

It’s not only the road toll that suffers, but accidents at work are more likely to occur when there is a lack of sleep. Workplace injuries are a very real concern and can have disastrous effects.

Extra weight without the eight!

By not getting the recommended average 8 hours of good-quality sleep a night to function properly, it can lead to weight gain. The two hormones in the body, leptin and ghrelin, control feelings of hunger and fullness, and these two hormones are directly affected by sleep!

Getting moody

A lack of sleep can affect your mood, and you can become more likely to have conflict with others in your personal relationships and at work. You may also feel less motivated to complete normal day-to-day tasks as well as pursue larger goals in life.

effects of lack of sleep on your body healthmint medical centre cranbourne northCan you reverse the effects of a lack of sleep?

Sleep debt is accumulated when there is a lack of sleep and you can enter a sleep deficit. You can settle short term debt by adding a couple of extra hours of sleep over the following week if you are 10 hours or less behind in sleep.

Of course the best way to avoid the effects of a lack of sleep is to get the recommended 7-9 hours of good quality shut eye each night.

 

If you are feeling the effects of a lack of sleep, it may be time to look at the reasons why you are depriving your body of it. Both intentional and unintentional reasons cause the same effects. No matter if you are staying up too late, have shift work, demanding jobs, family obligations or young babies, these are all common causes. By addressing the reasons why, choices can be made to improve the quality and time spent in the land of nod!

If you are concerned about the amount of sleep you are (or are not getting!) Then book an appointment with one of our great HealthMint GPs. They may be able to assist you with the causes and treatment options for short and long term sleep issues.

morning yoga healthmint

8 Benefits of Exercise

By | Body Systems, Chronic Disease, Chronic Pain, Diabetes, General Wellbeing, Lifestyle, Men's Health, Mental Health, Women's Health | No Comments

Living a healthy lifestyle can be beneficial to your health, prevent some illnesses and diseases and can help to improve your mental health! Here we look into 8 benefits of exercise. 

1. Exercise boosts and benefits your mood

One of the most common mental benefits of exercise is stress relief. Exercise helps to block negative thoughts and distracts from daily worries and stresses. It  only releases the levels of, but also increases the levels of chemicals like serotonin and endorphins that can moderate responses to stress. It’s a win win!

benefits of exercise improve mood healthmint 2. Exercise assists in weight loss and helps prevent unhealthy weight gain

Exercise is extremely helpful in the journey of weight loss and weight management. Exercise speeds up metabolism, and increased activity levels increases the body’s fuel consumption (calories).

Regular physical activity combined with a healthy diet will increase the chances of weight loss.

8 benefits of exercise control weight loss healthmint3. Exercise reduces the risk of and helps to manage cardiovascular disease, reduce risk of heart attack, lower blood cholesterol, lower blood pressure

Regular physical activity can greatly reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and can actually also help to lower blood pressure! Lowering the levels of cholesterol and keeping your arteries clear of fatty deposits by undertaking regular exercise can reduce the chances of heart attacks and strokes.

8 benefits of exercise cardiovascular health heart healthmint4. Social interaction and exercise go hand-in-hand

Find an exercise buddy – grab a friend or family member and hit the pavement. Let’s face it, exercise is more fun with someone and it works both ways to motivate each other and keeps each other’s exercise goals in check.

8 benefits of exercise socialising healthmint5. Build strong muscles and bones

Exercise that involves weight bearing like walking, stair climbing, weightlifting helps to preserve bone mass which can help protect against osteoporosis. Exercise also builds and strengthens muscles which in turn protects the bones from injury and support and protect the jones that might be susceptible to or affected by arthritis. It also improves the blood supply to muscles and can help prevent age related loss of muscle mass.

8 benefits of exercise strong kids dad family healthmint

6. Reduce the risk and help manage Type 2 Diabetes

For those with Type 2 Diabetes, physical exercise is a critical party of the treatment plan. Exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood! It helps with keeping blood glucose levels in check and in the correct range. Controlling blood glucose levels is essential in combating long term complications such as heart problems.

7. Exercise helps with sleep quality and benefits energy levels

When you exercise, your body naturally depletes its energy stores which helps when trying to fall asleep. When exercising, you may have longer, deeper and greater quality sleeps which helps make you feel more energised throughout the day. Around 30 minutes of exercise is all it can take for a better nights sleep and more energised days!

8 benefits of exercise boost mood aid sleep healthmint8. Lower the risk of falls with exercise

Exercise is a proven way to prevent falls by improving balance and strengthening the muscles that keep us upright.  As we get older, a fear of falling may limit the decision to want to undertake exercise – but this can have a damaging affect and actually increase the risks of developing chronic diseases and the probability of falls.

Of course, there are many more reasons other than these 8 benefits of exercise to consider. Being regularly physically active will always have positive effects on your mind, body and soul, it’s just about finding the types of exercise that suits you and your lifestyle, setting small, achievable goals to start off with, and building up the process of becoming a healthier, happier YOU!

Before undergoing any new types of exercise make sure you have a medical check from your HealthMint GP. You can even get a FREE* Health Check Up (valued at $159) to get you started on your journey to great health and on your way to your fitness and exercise goals.

tmj pain and how to treat it healthmint medical centre cranbourne north

TMJ Pain And How To Treat It

By | Body Systems, Chronic Pain | No Comments

TMJ Pain And How To Treat It

Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a pain in the jaw that can be caused by numerous medical issues. Keep reading to find out what TMJ pain is and how to treat it.

The TMJ connects the lower jaw (mandible) to the skull (temporal bone) in front of the ear. These joints allow the movements needed for facial expressions, speaking, singing, whistling and eating.

TMJ disorders are quite common, and they can cause abnormal jaw movements, pain and noises in the joint. Often TMJ can feel like your jaw is popping, clicking or momentarily getting stuck. Sufferers of TMJ pain may experience either sharp pain or a dull, constant ache. 

Image from the Mayo Clinic
TMJ

Symptoms of TMJ pain

  • Locking of the jaw – which makes it difficult to open or close your mouth
  • Discomfort or pain in the jaw which is common during eating
  • An uneven or uncomfortable bite
  • Clicking and grating noises when chewing and opening mouth
  • Aching pain in the front of ear, which may spread to the rest of the face
  • Headaches, pain and pressure behind the eyes
  • Dizziness and vision problems
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Pain in the neck and shoulders

tmj pain and how to treat it healthmint medical centre cranbourne northWhat can cause TMJ pain?

  • Stress
  • Jaw clenching and teeth grinding
  • An injury
  • Dental issues – new dentures and fillings
  • Osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, gout, rheumatoid arthritis
  • Genes and/or hormones
  • Infections and autoimmune diseases

Occasionally, people have TMJ pain without any obvious cause.

How to treat TMJ pain

To relieve the symptoms of TMJ you can try the following:

  • Cutting food into small pieces
  • Eating softer foods
  • Avoid clenching your jaw
  • Taking over the counter medications, pain relievers or anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Wearing a mouthguard when sleeping
  • Avoiding chewing gum
  • Not opening your mouth wide
  • Gentle jaw stretches

tmj pain and how to treat it healthmint medical centre cranbourne northIf you or someone you know may be suffering from any of the above signs of TMJ, you can book an appointment online to discuss your symptoms and treatment options. See our wonderful team of GPs here.

If necessary, our GPs may refer you to see a dentist for specialist treatment for your TMJ pain. Berwick Dental Studio in Berwick may be able to help – you can check out their amazing range of dental services here

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here
Call Now Button