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Casey Cardinia Business Awards Finalist

Casey Cardinia Business Awards Finalist

By | Business, Clinic News, Featured, General Wellbeing | No Comments

HealthMint Medical Centre in Cranbourne North has been nominated as a finalist for the the 2019 Casey-Cardinia Business Awards!

The awards is an annual partnership between the City of Casey and Cardinia Shire Council to recognise and celebrate the outstanding achievements and contributions of businesses and organisations in the local area.

We are in the running for the Health, Education and Well-being award, as well as in the running for the coveted Casey Cardinia Business of the Year Award!

In the four years since opening, HealthMint Medical Centre have been re-imagining the GP clinic and have succeeded in creating a space where our patients feel heard, relaxed, respected, and confident that their health is in good hands.

The famous 5 minute wait time has been splashed across the media this year and it has been a real game changer when it comes to setting the clinic apart. With the aid of state of the art technology to save time, being efficient has allowed for more time available with the clinic’s doctors, nurses, and allied health specialists.

HealthMint believes in delivering a high quality service while keeping prices affordable, and healthcare accessible to all. A proactive and preventative approach of healthcare is constantly at the forefront of the medical centre’s model, and with initiatives like free Health Check Ups for new patients and the availability of health check-lists during appointments, niche services like Iron Infusions, skin checks, and bulk billed Quick Consults, the health and wellbeing of the patients are always the priority.

The winners of the Casey Cardinia Business Awards Finalist will be announced at a Gala Dinner on Friday 18th October at the Cranbourne Racing Centre.

With excitement in the air, several of our team members will be in attendance on the night with fingers and toes crossed!

HealthMint wishes all the finalists good-luck and cannot wait to celebrate with the other local business on the night.

You can see a complete list of the wonderful finalists here:

https://caseycardinia.com.au/business-awards/2019-finalists

 

Casey Cardinia Business Awards FinalistCasey Cardinia Business Awards Finalist

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here
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Common Health Myths

By | Body Systems, Featured, General Wellbeing, Lifestyle, Uncategorized | No Comments

It’s important to revisit what we know about our health to check that our knowledge is actually based on good science. Here are 5 common health myths you might have come across, and why they might not be as accurate as many people think.

  1. You can catch a cold by getting cold

It sounds obvious – if you get cold and wet, you’ll come down with a cold.  These days, most people know that colds are in fact caused by a virus, but they’re still quick to blame being cold for their illness.

We pick up viruses and other organisms through contact with other infected people. While these colds are more likely during the cold winter months, it’s likely that the majority of infections are picked up because bad weather forces people indoors, in closer proximity to one another.

The air temperature might have some impact on how long viruses can stay alive, and that inhaling cold air can cool the nasal passage down which can help some viruses to break the mucus barrier and enter the body. However, while cold weather can make it more likely that you will catch a cold, it’s not the weather’s fault when you’re ill.

  1. Cracking your joints can cause arthritis

People who crack their knuckles are routinely told they are making themselves more susceptible to arthritis. The truth is that the risk of arthritis is almost exactly the same for people who do crack their knuckles when compared to people who don’t.

When you crack your knuckles, you are pulling apart the joint very slightly. That causes a pressure decrease in the fluid that keeps the joints lubricated. Bubbles form in the fluid, and the variation in pressure causes the cracking sound. It might be annoying to people around you, but it won’t give you arthritis.

  1. Drink eight glasses of water every day.

Drinking water is essential for a healthy body, but how much should we be drinking? The answer is – enough. The amount of water each person needs can vary widely. Another factor that can influence how much water you need to consume is how much liquid you are consuming from other sources. 80% of an average person’s water intake is sourced from drinks (including caffeinated beverages like coffee), with 20% coming from the food they eat.

Studies show that on average, women require 2.7 litres of water per day, with men requiring 3.7 litres. However, that figure represents the total water intake – meaning your coffee counts. You should still try to drink water, but forcing yourself to drink a pre-determined amount is not necessary.

  1. Choosing low-fat products is better for your health

Low-fat products are sold as healthier options, but that advertising is misleading in many cases. Many low-fat products have increased sugar and salt to compensate for the loss of taste. Low-fat products can contain as many (or even more) kilojoules than their full-fat equivalents. Fat can help you feel full for longer, and a carefully balanced diet will include some healthy fats. Advertisers are very good at getting you to choose their product, but don’t be deceived by claims on the packaging.  A better strategy for choosing healthier options is to practice reading nutritional labels.

  1. The flu vaccine causes the flu

It’s a common misunderstanding that the flu vaccine can give people the flu. The truth is, you cannot catch influenza from a flu shot. The flu vaccine contains inactivated viruses that can’t harm you. However, some people do have mild side effects from the vaccination such as low-grade fever and body aches that can cause them to incorrectly self-diagnose with the flu. It’s important to remember that the flu vaccine is most often offered during periods of increased risk of catching the flu, which can cause a false association between the symptoms and the vaccine.

The vaccine only contains the strains of the influenza virus that authorities predict are the most likely for that season, which leaves people potentially open to other strains of influenza. It also does not provide 100% immunity, although most people will experience reduced symptoms if they do happen to catch the virus. Lastly, many people pick up a bad cold and mistakenly assume they have the flu – and blame their flu shot. Getting the flu shot helps protect you and vulnerable members of the community, and could save you from getting seriously sick.

When it comes to your health, the right advice is crucial. If you are looking for answers to your health questions, your GP is a great place to start. Cut through the conflicting information and get health advice tailored directly to your personal situation.

Want more information?

Call (03) 5611 3365 to speak to a friendly patient concierge

or book an appointment here
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